The Sprouts – Bulgogi Inspired Korean Tacos

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Last week I watched a show on food truck vendors. As I watched, my mouth started watering. It sparked the idea for a Korean taco during this weeks travels. It seemed like the perfect way to introduce more of the Korean flavors while providing a little “familiarity” of a flour tortilla taco. The ground beef allows for quick marinating with all the flavor!! If you haven’t tried kimchee, this is a great way to get exposure with a lighter, non-pickled, moderately spicy kimchee slaw.

Bulgogi-Inspired Korean Tacos with Spicy Slaw:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/08/kogi-inspired-bulgogi-tacos-spicy-slaw-recipe-mexican-asian.html

We had half a cabbage left in our CSA bin, so we replaced the other half with baby bok choy— and would do it again.

We doubled the amount of salt on the cabbage and increased the sit time to 30 minutes to remove the excess water. We did not use mayonnaise in the coleslaw to keep it more authentic to Korea.

For additional spice, on the adult tacos, we added Korean Kochujang (also spelled Gochujang) paste

As O was eating his second taco, he exclaimed, “It’s a little messy. But this is GOOD!”

In addition to eating the Korean inspired tacos, we also read K is for Korea by Hyechong Cheung and Prodeepta Das. Each letter of the English alphabet highlights different aspects of Korean life.

B is for Buchaechum, a spectacular Korean fan dance. Young women in traditional dress, dance in patterns that represent flowers in full bloom. Here is a video demonstrating the dance. I like this one because it is short but shows the intricate floral configurations. There are many others as well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvO36oRydms

We made our own versions of the fans and danced along while watching the video. Skoogie choose feathers and tissue paper, while O drew an Asian elephant and sushi (he was excited to learn that Koreans also like sushi).

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D is for Dojang, the identity seal used by Koreans. A college friend of mine taught English in Korea for a year and gave me a Dojang. While typically used on official documents, we stamped the fans with my Dojang to make them “official.

To Make the Fans:

1. Draw a fan in the shape of a pie piece on cardstock or a recycled file folder.

2. Cut the fan out

3. Decorate with a floral or nature theme (birds, rocks, trees, etc.) using markers/crayons, feathers, tissue paper and other items you find around your home.

4. If you want, glue the fan onto a craft or popsicle stick.


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